Social Psychology Network

Maintained by Scott Plous, Wesleyan University

Dahlia Moore

Dahlia Moore

I am Dean of the School of Behavioral Sciences at the College of Management-Academic Studies. My research interests include family-work conflict or enrichment, gender stereotypes, social justice, and social responsibility. I am searching for partnerships to create international academic programs to enable our students a semester abroad and hosting students and professors from abroad who can teach in English. Also, I am interested in creating applied social science academic programs based on high academic standards and innovative interdisciplinary domains.

Primary Interests:

  • Applied Social Psychology
  • Gender Psychology
  • Life Satisfaction, Well-Being
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Political Psychology
  • Prejudice and Stereotyping
  • Self and Identity

Books:

Journal Articles:

  • Moore, D. (2006). Why don’t they demand more? Entitlement and work values of religious and secular men and women in Israel. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36(8), 1924-1960.
  • Moore, D. (2008). Towards a more just world: What makes people participate in social action? Advances in Group Processes, 25, 213-240.
  • Moore, D. (2007). Self perceptions and social misconceptions: The implications of gender traits for locus of control and life satisfaction. Sex Roles, 56(11-12), 767-780.
  • Moore, D. (2009). Job concessions, role conflict and work satisfaction in gender-typical and -atypical occupation: The case of Israel. Gender Issues, 26(1), 42-64.

Other Publications:

  • Moore, D. (2011). Feminism in Israel: A slow but noticeable change in women’s Psychology. In A. Rutherford, R. Capdevila, V., Undurti, & I. Palmary (Eds.), Handbook of International Feminism (pp. 59-82). New York: Springer.
  • Moore, D., & Guy, A. (2011). The Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Changes in attitudes and identities. In D. Landis & R. Albert (Eds.), Handbook of Ethnocultural Conflict. New York: Springer.
  • Moore, D. (2011). What makes them happy? Comparing working and non working men and women in typical and atypical occupations. In G. Tanucci, M. Cortini, & E. Morin (Eds.), Boundaryless careers and occupational wellbeing. An interdisciplinary approach. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Courses Taught:

  • Gender, Family and Work
  • Graduate Research Seminar
  • Graduate Research Workshop
  • Organizational Sociology (M.A.)
  • Social Policy

Dahlia Moore
Department of Behavioral Sciences
College of Management-Academic Studies
7 Yitzhak Rabin Avenue
75190 Rishon LeZion
Israel

  • Work: +972-3-9634422
  • Home: +972-3-6412596
  • Mobile: +972-508-531513
  • Fax: +972-3-9634173

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